Pow Wow

Saturday August 18 and Sunday August 19, 2018

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Each year Pikwakanagan welcomes hundreds of dancers, numerous drum groups and thousands of spectators to celebrate Algonquin culture at our traditional pow wow. It is held on the third weekend in August.

Visitors are attracted to our dance, songs, drumming and experiencing an Algonquin cultural tradition. There is also opportunity to view and purchase unique items at our many vendors selling: jewelry, crafts, art, clothing, beadwork, leather purses, regalia, drums, CD’s, dreamcatchers, moccasins and many other items. Another attraction is the variety of food vendors offering Indian Tacos, native foods and other treats.

Saturday, August 18
Grand Entry, 12 noon
Supper Break, 5 pm to 7 pm
Social Evening Dancing and Drumming, 7 pm

Sunday, August 19
Grand Entry, 12 noon
Give away and closing, 5 pm

Admission: $ 6; 12 yrs under Free

Please remember that this is a ceremony. The songs that are sung and the dances that are danced are prayers to the Creator. The Grand Entry is a ceremony, so is the lighting of the Sacred Fire. Many people will approach the Spiritual Leader for prayers for their health or that of their family. Days prior to the celebration a Sacred Fire is lit and remains ablaze by volunteers for four straight days. An Evening Social is held on Friday and festivities include the initiation of new dancers and new regalia. The Grand Entry begins at noon on both Saturday and Sunday.

There are rules that govern a Pow Wow as well. All dancing revolves clockwise from the entrance, situated in the east, around the central arbour. Carrying flags and staffs in the Grand Entry is an honour. Songs are sung for fallen Veterans and for those returning from battle. The flags and staffs are retired each day at sunset.

No alcohol, drugs or pets are permitted on the Pow Wow grounds. 

From the book Anishnabe 101, by The Circle of Turtle Lodge:

It is important that the clothing, footwear, head dresses, etc. that a dancer wears be referred to as regalia and not as a costume. A costume is something for any actor to wear as he/she pretends to be someone else. A dancer’s regalia is a collection of gifts that honour his or her spiritual name and/or clan. Each is considered as sacred, and when worn together, the dancer becomes who he or she truly is, for all to see.

Accommodations
Travelers camp overnight on the grounds or in nearby towns, such as Eganville or Pembroke.